Saturday, 27 July 2013

modern meadow garden



(revised with more photos, now in week 12)

Here in my own garden, just outside the studio window we have worked hard creating a meadow. This is it's first year (2013) and has proven to be successful so far.

This is our view from our workplace and I wanted an uncluttered, dreamy space that frees the mind to enable us to work without too many external influences. Our drawing boards and Harriet's desk looks out onto this space.



The garden has been scraped to remove all nutrient rich top soil leaving a sandy sub-base which was sprayed with a glysophate weedkiller to eradicate - nettles, couch grass and other weeds.

We have sown two types of meadow seed and we are currently enjoying the following:

Annual Seed Mix
Cornflower's
Corn Marigold's
Common poppy
Corn Chamomile
Corn Cockles

Perennial Seed Mix

Wild Carrot
Bulbous Buttercup
Yarrow
Cowslip

Meadow seed supplied by really wild flowers




There are over 20 other species of meadow seed to germinate and grow through the season, so I'll take further photos and record the success (or failure) of each.

We have seen many butterfly visitors including:

Peacock
Red Admiral
Meadow Brown
Brimstone
Small White
Orange Tip
Large White
Speckled Wood
Holly Blue
Comma

The hardscapes are a repeat from those used in the front garden:

Sawn and sandblasted grey sandstone, butt jointed for a minimalistic, clean look and quartz paddlestones used for walls and step risers. The trellis is a linear softwood painted in grey to tie in with the windows of the house and studio and hides the composters.


Our super, comfortable, modern furniture made from black steel and polyester rope.



The garden is framed by a mature Laurel hedge (Prunus rotundifolia) and Beech (Fagus sylvatica). There are a series of yew (Taxus baccata) cubes planted in the meadow, to form structure and contrast to the meadow, influenced by my many visits to the late Christopher Lloyd's garden at Dixter.

The shade border is planted with sculptural Dicksonia antartica with climbing Hydrangea petiolaris and underplanted with Hakonechloa macra, a simple and bold combination.




The main terrace appears to float in the meadow, I have not mown a path to it yet. It's a great place to sit, rest and contemplate.













Here's a close up of week 12 the corn cockles are now appearing, mauve - pink in colour.


















Tuesday, 23 July 2013

Designing a garden for a difficult site

A garden is only as good as its custodian. As much as we as designers put together our plans, proposals, perspectives, moodboards and material selections. A garden needs constant care, weeding, feeding, deadheading, nurturing as well as enjoyment and pleasure.

Our clients in Leigh, Kent have embraced their new garden with gusto.



This garden has an existing Church wall to its boundary and a new block retaining wall, the garden has a repetition of green oak,
1. used to form steps through a planted border,
2. to create height and structure against the rendered wall,
3. for raised salad and vegetable planters
4. posts for the tension wire barrier.

The changes in level on this site are significant, the lawn is over 2 metres above the terrace.





Rendered retaining wall and limestone paving



The helenium's looking amazing




Raised oak planter full of carrots, chard, herbs and companion plants  - marigolds that give off strong odour repelling the green and black fly, their new greenhouse in the background.




Garden designed by greencube
Garden constructed by Langdale Landscapes






Sculpture in the garden, greencube designs a sculptural ball garden

I'm still out taking photos of all the gardens that have been constructed in the last year and last night I visited our clients in Borough Green, Kent to photograph this garden.

We designed the terracing around this very beautiful home and picked up on the existing buff coloured stone detailing that formed the sills and frames around the doors and windows. A complimentary colour  of yellow granite was finally chosen (Yellow Granite paving from CED) and a sculptural border of yellow granite balls (from Rock Unique) underplanted with Ilex crenata balls and Libertia grandiflora. Oak benches and oak arches have also been included and some division of zones created by deck laid flush with granite. This scheme fuses well with the house and setting.


I will return in August to take further photos when the garden furniture is in place and hopefully get some night shots, lighting not yet fully completed at time of visit.


Greencube planted this garden in two phases, the trees, root ball yew hedges and Ilex crenata hedges were planted in February and the rest of the planting went in during the spring of 2013.








Sunday, 14 July 2013

Greencube's own Meadow Study

greencube's own garden

Here in my own garden, just outside the studio window we have worked hard creating a meadow. This is it's first year (2013) and has proven to be successful so far.

This is our view from our workplace and I wanted an uncluttered, dreamy space that frees the mind to enable us to work without too many external influences. Our drawing boards and Harriet's desk looks out onto this space.



The garden has been scraped to remove all nutrient rich top soil leaving a sandy sub-base which was sprayed with a glysophate weedkiller to eradicate - nettles, couch grass and other weeds.

We have sown two types of meadow seed and we are currently enjoying the following:

Annual Seed Mix
Cornflower's
Corn Marigold's
Common poppy
Corn Chamomile

Perennial Seed Mix

Wild Carrot
Bulbous Buttercup
Yarrow
Cowslip

Meadow seed supplied by really wild flowers




There are over 20 other species of meadow seed to germinate and grow through the season, so I'll take further photos and record the success (or failure) of each.

We have seen many butterfly visitors including:

Peacock
Red Admiral
Meadow Brown
Brimstone
Small White
Orange Tip
Large White
Speckled Wood
Holly Blue
Comma

The hardscapes are a repeat from those used in the front garden:

Sawn and sandblasted grey sandstone, butt jointed for a minimalistic, clean look and quartz paddlestones used for walls and step risers. The trellis is a linear softwood painted in grey to tie in with the windows of the house and studio and hides the composters.


Our super, comfortable, modern furniture made from black steel and polyester rope.



The garden is framed by a mature Laurel hedge (Prunus rotundifolia) and Beech (Fagus sylvatica). There are a series of yew (Taxus baccata) cubes planted in the meadow, to form structure and contrast to the meadow, influenced by my many visits to the late Christopher Lloyd's garden at Dixter.

The shade border is planted with sculptural Dicksonia antartica with climbing Hydrangea petiolaris and underplanted with Hakonechloa macra, a simple and bold combination.




The main terrace appears to float in the meadow, I have not mown a path to it yet. It's a great place to sit, rest and contemplate.